Important information about Coronavirus

For the latest information and help go to :- https://www.gov.uk/coronavirus

Also for local news go to:- https://hbcnewsroom.co.uk/coronaadvice/

ONLY USE NHS 111 if you feel it necessary.

Do keep in touch with your friends and neighbours when possible. Use your phone or post a note through their letterbox.

PUT A READABLE POSTER IN YOUR WINDOW IF YOU NEED HELP.

Please remember that you never have to struggle on alone. If you have any concerns about caring for someone with dementia through the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, please call the dementia specialist Admiral Nurses on our Helpline, on 0800 888 6678 or email helpline@dementiauk.org.

The Helpline is open seven days a week, 9am-9pm Monday to Friday, and 9am-5pm on weekends.

(A Stranger can be a Friend after a Chat)

Talking about your feelings can help you stay in good mental health and deal with times when you feel troubled.

Talking about your feelings isn’t a sign of weakness. It’s part of taking charge of your wellbeing and doing what you can to stay healthy.

Talking can be a way to cope with a problem you’ve been carrying around in your head for a while. Just being listened to can help you feel supported and less alone. And it works both ways. If you open up, it might encourage others to do the same.

It’s not always easy to describe how you’re feeling. If you can’t think of one word, use lots. What does it feel like inside your head? What does it make you feel like doing?

You don’t need to sit with someone for a big conversation about your wellbeing. Many people feel more comfortable when these conversations develop naturally – maybe when you’re doing something together.

If it feels awkward at first, give it time. Make talking about your feelings something that you do.

(A Stranger can be a Friend after a Chat)